In 2006 I travelled to New York to attend a workshop with Tom Myers hoping to drag him over to tour and teach Bowen people in the UK, which he subsequently did.  We also did a dissection together which is another story!

His workshop was being held at The Breathing Project in Manhattan and whilst chatting one day a man called Leslie Kaminoff told me about Gil Hedley and how I should get on one of his classes.

Long story short, I found myself in 2007 on a plane to San Francisco and the process of falling in love with dissection and anatomy began.

Gil was already an old hand at this business and in the layers around the muscle and deep fascia held no drama for me. In the visceral tissues I found myself freaking out and it took me several years for me to find my way around these tissues with any degree of confidence, urged on my Gil and his deep love of visceral tissues.  In the last year, adding to my understanding the deep function, cellular behaviour and chemistry of what is going on in these tissues has only increased my love of the area and even the toughest day working in this tissue is now a pleasure and thrill.

At the end of the 2007 class, I asked Gil if he would come to the UK.  Being asked that kind of question regularly myself, my response is always, “Yes sure!”  I am fairly confident that I will walk away from that conversation and it’ll be last time I ever hear from that person.

Gil was no different and felt pretty sure that I’d never be heard from again.  Point being, I only asked because I was pretty sure I could find somewhere to work from. St George’s hospital London and Cery Davies, the then professor of anatomy, were only too pleased to take our cash and offer us the chance to run a course, leaving Gil with no option but to agree to come over to the UK.

So began ten years of working with Gil and learning his approaches to dissection, at the same time building my own understanding and methods of both embalming and dissection and studying like a demon to raise my knowledge. I doubt that I will ever get to the level of Gil in terms of dissection skill and knowledge, but I like to think that with his guidance, I have developed myself and my eye over the years to bring a certain something to a dissection room.

My approach these days is somewhat different to Gil in terms of defining what it is we are doing in a lab, but only from the side of how the content is thought about and delivered .  The dissection principles remain pretty much how Gil designed it.  Why change what works?

Gil is a master dissector, anatomist, story teller and human being and my approaches and ways of dissecting are learned almost entirely from him.  His hard work, dedication, forward thinking and sheer determination have laid the ground for people like me to follow, on the shoulders of giants indeed.

The methods of reflecting skin and then superficial fascia as a separate entity is something he pioneered and although not something that I generally do in such depth any more mainly due to time limits, it has created an understanding of these tissues as a unit which is unique.  The ability to challenge some of the more worrying ideas around this layer has come almost entirely from Gil.

I would be the first to admit that Gil and I have not always seen eye to eye in terms of approach, content or management in various aspects, but the ability to disagree, argue and even fall out is perhaps something that  is the result of getting close to people.

Gil was and is my inspiration for dissecting and challenging the illogical and old fashioned concepts of anatomy that still reign supreme today, even in the face of challenges.  A dissection workshop with Gil is truly a remarkable experience and one that anyone with aspirations to understand the human form should attend.

Many people will have been on a workshop with Gil and have their lives changed.  Few however would be able  to say that ten years later their lives were dedicated to the same process and path that started in San Francisco all those years ago in an experience for which I will always remain profoundly grateful.